• The 70ft (21 metre) BugJuggler was created by a former Nasa engineer
  • The design features a 70ft (21 metres) tall robot that uses hydraulic cylinders to hurl and catch cars
  • The giant droid will use a diesel engine to generate hydraulic pressure
  • An operator located in the robot’s head will be able to control its motions using a haptic feedback connected to high-speed servo valves
  • It will be powered by hydraulic accumulators, or fluid storage batteries
  • Grannet is looking for $2.3million (£1.35 million) to fund the project

By
Victoria Woollaston

In what looks like a cross between the fictional Iron Giant and a Transformer, this robotic beast could one day be juggling cars at an event near you.   

Former Nasa engineer Dan Granett has designed a 70ft (21 metres) tall robotic man capable of hurling heavy objects, namely the Volkswagen Beetle, at car rallies.

Dubbed BugJuggler, Granett envisions a remote-controlled, towering droid that uses hydraulic cylinders to launch the vehicles into the air.

Former Nasa engineer Dan Granett has designed a 70ft (21 metres) tall robotic man capable of juggling cars,  (illustration pictured) namely the Volkswagen Beetle. Dubbed BugJuggler, Granett envisions a towering droid that uses hydraulic cylinders to hurl cars into the air at car rallies

BUGJUGGLER SPECIFICATIONS

BugJuggler was developed by former Nasa engineer Dan Granett.

It is a 70ft (21 metres) tall robot that uses hydraulic cylinders to hurl cars.

The giant droid will use a diesel engine to generate hydraulic pressure.

An operator located in the robot’s head will be able to control its motions using a haptic feedback connected to high-speed servo valves.

It will be powered by hydraulic accumulators, or fluid storage batteries.

Grannet is looking for $2.3million (£1.35 million) to fund the project. 

‘BugJuggler represents a new frontier in robotic entertainment,’ explained Grannet.

‘Moving beyond the car crushing robots of the past century, BugJuggler will use 21st century technology to perform breathtaking feats, including juggling up to three cars simultaneously.’

According to Grannet’s designs, an operator located in the robot’s head will be able to control its motions using haptic feedback, connected to high-speed servo valves.

It will be powered by hydraulic accumulators – storage batteries for hydraulic fluid – which will allow for the smooth movement needed for the BugJuggler to throw cars or other large, heavy objects.

BugJuggler would also operate within a ‘safety radius’, in case a car is dropped.

An operator located in the robot's head will be able to control its motions using haptic feedback. It will be powered by hydraulic accumulators - storage batteries for hydraulic fluid - which will allow for the smooth movement needed for the BugJuggler to throw cars (illustration pictured) or other large, heavy objects

An operator located in the robot’s head will be able to control its motions using haptic feedback. It will be powered by hydraulic accumulators – storage batteries for hydraulic fluid – which will allow for the smooth movement needed for the BugJuggler to throw cars (illustration pictured) or other large, heavy objects

BugJuggler looks similar to the Iron Giant (pictured) in the 1999 film of the same name. It was based on the 1968 story, Iron Man, by former British poet laureate Ted Hughes

BugJuggler looks similar to the Iron Giant (pictured) in the 1999 film of the same name. It was based on the 1968 story, Iron Man, by former British poet laureate Ted Hughes

Granett and his team are currently seeking investment for his project, estimated to cost $2.3 million (£1.3 million)

Granett and his team are currently seeking investment for his project, estimated to cost $2.3 million (£1.3 million)

The first stage of the BugJuggler project will be construction of a working 8ft (2.4 metre) tall single arm. proof-of-principle juggler, able to toss and catch a 250lb (113kg) mass.

The finished version will need to be capable of holding, and throwing, a typical Volkswagen Beetle weighing 2,700lb (1,220kg).

Granett was a technician at Nasa’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and built mechanisms for experiments on space shuttle flights during the 1980s.

He is a hydraulics expert and previously built a diesel and hydraulic vehicle used to move six tonne, 40ft (12 metre) sections of pipe up a tunnel in California.

He also designed, built and operated the equipment for the in-flight fight scene in the James Bond movie The Living Daylights.

Granett and his team are currently seeking investment for his project, estimated to cost $2.3 million (£1.3 million)

 

The comments below have not been moderated.

BeachMomma,

MIami,

8 minutes ago

If it is built – please don’t hook it up to SkyNet.

PrivateSi,

WORCS,

21 minutes ago

TOO SINISTER – do you really want the Military creating GIANT KILLER ROBOTS that this MAD SCIENTIST is trying to normalise and put a +ve spin on ‘for The Kids’…… This is not the way we should be going, indoctrinated Android Brains….

eonuk,

manchester,

35 minutes ago

brave photographer – i’d never stand that close

Drew Peacock,

Rueschlikon, Switzerland,

35 minutes ago

So it doesn’t actually exist. More misleadingly headlined non news.

Dan,

Manchester, United Kingdom,

36 minutes ago

Footage?

mundane,

Poole, United Kingdom,

44 minutes ago

… and the purpose for this is? Will it stop hunger in the world? Will it stop war?

LiliK,

NFLD, Canada,

13 minutes ago

have fun?

Andy001,

Leeds,

11 minutes ago

Yes, because all human endeavours throughout human history are solely devoted to ending hunger and war. Live a little man!

eonuk,

manchester,

47 minutes ago

Need to be careful, if it malfunctions it could destroy an entire city

Myasre Ishuge,

On a Welsh Mountain, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

Let’s see now – what could possibly go wrong?

eonuk,

manchester,

37 minutes ago

Why does anyone fund anything??

RobertG,

Rockville, United States,

17 minutes ago

Gravity.

tim_uk74,

Bottesford, United Kingdom,

1 hour ago

Whatever could go wrong?!?!

Edy,

SP, Brazil,

1 hour ago

Not a good idea, since this robot could mistakenly throw a car at the audience.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Who is this week’s top commenter?
Find out now